FAQ

Who makes the products?

Leatherbound is a one-man operation. All products are made by Silas Perry, the owner and maker.

Where is Leatherbound based?

Leatherbound is an American company registered in New Mexico, USA. I live in Taiwan where I make and ship the products from.

Do you offer a warranty?

Yes. All Leatherbound products are backed with a Lifetime Warranty.

Can you customize products?

Yes. Just tell me what you have in mind and I’ll send you a quote.

Will the items patina?

All standard leathers are vegetable tanned, which will patina. You’ll see colors darken and textures become smoother over time.

How should I care for my product?

Handling the products frequently, in fact, imparts oils from our hands, which is generally sufficient to keep the leather in good shape. If you find  your product looking dry, contact us for care suggestions.

Some of your wallets don’t seem to lay flat, will that change over time?

That’s right, some wallets don’t lay flat initially, as some of the leathers I use are quite firm. It will just take a little use for them to soften and lay flat.

Unlined, semi-lined, and fully lined, what do they mean and which should I get?

Lining leather is simply attaching a second piece of leather to the inside of the item, grain side out.

Unlined is self-explanatory. You can see the rough side of the leather when the item is open.

Semi-lined means that the body of the piece is lined, but other components (e.g. pockets are not). This has the advantage of strengthening the piece, and providing a very clean look.

Fully lined extends the lining to the whole piece, so pockets would be lined as well. Extending the lining does add strength, but also complexity and a considerable increase in price.

Most of our work is semi-lined, which for many pieces, elevates the look, adds strength, but without the considerable price increase of fully lined pieces. 

Any of the lining options will result in a durable product that will age well.

Is hand stitching superior to machine stitching?

Yes. Saddle stitching, the method we employ, is technically far superior. It is more durable, easier to repair, and (if done properly) more aesthetically pleasing. The finest, most expensive boutiques in the world sew their goods using the same method.