The Making of a Minimalist Wallet

Here’s how I make our minimalist wallet.

Here are the hand tools I’ll be using to make the wallet.

First, I cut out all the pieces.

I’m using two of my favorite leathers, Pueblo from Badalassi Carlo and Buttero from Conceria Walpier. They’re two of the most famous leathers in the leathercraft world. A lot of the world’s best leather comes from a cluster of tanneries in Tuscany, these two included.

I’m using the ‘nazionale’ color for Pueblo and orange for Buttero. Blue and orange is quite easy on the eyes.

I use a die for the 2 ‘T-slots’ to save some time. The other pieces are hand cut. Quality-wise it doesn’t matter much how the pieces are cut initially.

Next I remove some material from the slots, which reduces a little unneeded bulk and helps so that the slots’ shape don’t show through.

Next, I crease and burnish the card pockets. Creasing is is decorative, and burnishing is a process of using friction to create a smooth, glassy edge that protects it from fraying. Only vegetable tanned leather will burnish properly.

Next, the smaller T-slot is glued to the top of the of body.

Few card holders utilize the design I’m employing. It does takes more work to glue and sew the extra material at the top, but it offers several advantages. 1. The middle pocket will be lined with leather 2. The top of the wallet is stronger 3. The edges are all one thickness, making it very sleek and streamlined.

The next T-slot can be immediately glued on.

Next, this pocket is prepared for stitching.

The pocket is sewn on and the stitching is flatten with flat-faced pliers.

The next card pocket is then glued on.

The top of the body is trimmed flush. Most handmade goods skip trimming which lead to poor finishing (if done at all) and crooked stitching lines.

Everything needs to be perfectly even for proper edge finishing and straight lines of stitching to take place.

Next, the stitching holes are made.

The tops are saddle stitched and the top is creased and burnished.

The two halves are now ready to be glued together. First I rough up the interior edges for better adhesion. Then the halves are carefully aligned.

As you can see, the top is lined up just right, but the other edges aren’t even. The wallet is made oversize for this reason. I now will take about 2 mm off the side and bottom and take the whole wallet to its final size.

The wallet has been trimmed and the stitching holes made. The dimensions have been carefully thought out so all the stitches are the same size and the card slots are not pierced.

Wallet is saddle stitched. Almost done here. Saddle stitching takes a lot of time, but other forms of sewing cannot compare in aesthetic or strength.

Sewing has been finished. Next the edges will be rounded, creased, and burnished.

Done

The Making of a Minimalist Bifold

Here’s how we make our minimalist bifold.

We use traditional techniques with leather from some of the highest regarded tanneries in the world to produce an item that is built to last for many years and age beautifully.

Below, I’m using Pueblo from the Badalassi Carlo tannery in Italy. It’s a vegetable tanned leather that has a slightly roughed up surface that gives it its distinctive, vintage look. These fibers will compact over time, giving it a great looking sheen.

These are the hand tools I’ll be using in making the wallet.


Leather is selected and pieces are cut. The exterior is the ortensia color, a stunning blue-green, and the interior is the cognac color.

The “T-slot” is thinned down with a French edger to reduce bulk.

Pockets are creased.

Edges are beveled and burnished.

Bevelling removes a thin strip of leather, rounding the edge.

Burnishing is a process of using friction to compact the fibers. It’s only possible to burnish vegetable tanned leather. Pueblo burnishes beautifully, becoming quite glassy.

I use water, CMC, and mill wax in the edge finishing. Varying grits of sandpaper are also essential in achieving a super smooth edge.

Pockets are glued to panels.

T-slot is sewn to panel.

Pocket is glued beneath T-slot, and left side is trimmed. Trimming provides a perfectly smooth edge, which will greatly aid in edge finishing.

Pocket is sewn on. The edge is then creased, beveled, and burnished as before.

Lining is glued to body.

Panels are glued on to body, and the wallet is trimmed to size.

Stitching holes are made.

Wallet is saddle stitched. Saddle stitching is a method of using two needles to achieve a very strong stitch that won’t unravel if a thread is cut.

Outer edges are creased, beveled, and burnished.

The wallet is finished.

Thanks for taking a look at our build process!

How to Make a Minimalist Wallet

Here’s how we make our minimalist wallet.

I’m using one of my favorite leathers, ‘Wax’ from the Badalassi Carlo Tannery in Italy. It is a full vegetable tanned leather with pull-up effect.

Pictured below are most of the tools you need. You’ll also need a stitching pony, a ruler, a cutting mat, a polyethylene board, a glue spreader, and a bone folder.

As far as consumables go, you’ll need some thin leather something around 0.8mm-1.1mm (2-3oz) will do the trick. Ours is 0.8mm (2oz) thick. Also needed is glue, thread, water, a finishing agent, and some finishing wax.

Step 1: Cut out the pieces

badalassi-carlo-wax

Step 2: Glue smaller T-slot onto back of small panel. The panel will face the inside of the wallet, making the wallet semi-lined. We use a water based contact adhesive.

Steps 3: Use a creaser to add a decorative line to the top of the T-slot, card pocket, and the back piece.

Step 4: Apply water to the top of the pockets, one by one. Use a canvas cloth to burnish. Use light pressure and be patient; it takes some time. Once your edge starts to look fairly shiny and smooth, you can then apply a finishing agent (we use Tokonole) and continue burnishing. Finally impregnate your canvas with some finishing wax (we use Columbus) and continue to burnish to a smooth, shiny finish.

Steps 5: Glue  finished T-slot under the 1st piece. Glue thinly on bottom of T-slot, too. Mark your stitching line with a wing divider.

Step 6: Punch stitching holes.

Step 7: Saddle stitch T-slot onto panel.

Step 8: Tap down stitches with a cobbler’s hammer.

Step 9: Glue as shown below. There’s a thick band of glue because we’ll be trimming it.

Step 10: Attach the two pieces and tap down with a cobbler’s hammer to promote adhesion.

Step 11: Trim the whole piece to size. Our wallet measures 10.5cmx7.8cm. We used a custom die to save some time, but using a knife accomplishes the same thing.

Step 12: Mark stitching line on top of wallet and punch.

Step 13: Saddle stitch top.

Step 14&15: Add decorative crease to the top of the wallet, and burnish as described before.

Step 16: Prepare front to be glued, by roughing up the edges with sandpaper as shown.

Step 17: Glue front and back. Did you make sure you finished the top edges? Line up the tops to be flush and leave room on the sides and bottom to trim.

Step 18: Trim around the correctly-sized front to make the whole piece flush. Keep your knife blade perpendicular to the surface, especially when cutting the corners.

Step 19: Mark or finish making your stitching line.

Step 20: Punch the holes. Start with where the card slots are and line up stitching chisels correctly so that you don’t pierce the edge of your card slots. Do this for both sides, and continue around the wallet until you’re done.

Step 21: Saddle stitch. Here’s ours halfway done.

Step 22: Bevel and crease the edges.

Step 23: Lightly sand the edges. Start out with something like 280, and work your way up to around 1200.

Step 24: Use burnishing method described in the earlier steps.

Step 25: Move a bone folder around the inside of the wallet to remove any glue from doing anything unwanted.

Step 26: Admire the awesome wallet you just made!

Front:

Back:

Top:

 

 

 

The Making of a Modern Bifold

Made a new product today, the modern bifold. 

I wanted to make a slim wallet with 6 card slots and room for bills.

I used floating card pockets of which bills can be placed in back of, keeping the wallet nice and trim.

Build

I’m using some really nice soft Italian veg tan from the Badalassi Carlo tannery.

First, the pieces are cut.

bifold-pieces-cut

A decorative crease is added to the top of each pocket. Some water, a Japanese finishing agent, and wax are used to burnish the top of the pockets to a smooth glassy texture.

bifold-pockets-burnished

All 4 of the V-slots are glued on and sewn, creating the first 4 pockets of the wallet.

v-slot-pockets

The last pocket is glued on, the pocket assembly is trimmed to size, and the top and inside-facing portion of the pocket assembly is sewn.

pocket-assembly

 

A crease is added next to the stitching and those edges are burnished.

pocket-assembly-finishing

The main body pieces are glued together, trimmed, sewn on the top, and burnished.

bifold-body

Pockets are glued on, wallet is trimmed to size, and holes are made for sewing.

bifold-assembled

Wallet is sewn. Then an edge beveller is used to round the edges, followed by adding a crease all around the inside and outside of the wallet. Finally the outer edges of wallet are burnished. The wallet is complete!

modern-bifold

Here are some extra shots of the completed wallet: